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20130204
20130212
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KQEH (PBS) 4
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Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
/11 obviously certainly on foreign policy became much more conservative. >> he always was. i mean, he was always a sort of new york zionist, supported israel wholeheartedly, you know, sent a delegation to central america in the mid-'80s to chart a course against, you know, sort of the communist rule in nicaragua. that sort of thing in foreign policy terms. but in sort of fiscal terms and in governance terms, he would say, you know, siding with criminals over law-abiding citizens is nuts. saying it's okay to do graffiti on subways is nuts. saying that it's okay for homeless people to sleep on grates on second avenue is nuts. this was all very much the way ordinary people felt, and they felt that democrats and the leadership of the left had turned against ordinary citizens and the good order of their lives. and he stood up against that. >> right. and seemed same and rational unless you were a member of the democratic establishment in the late '70s and '80s when koch was mayor. so it sounds very sane and rational right now in new york city. it didn't at the time. >> it was a much different -- the t
this video in iran, they put it on youtube. john reid is the national security reporter for foreign policy. he says he analyzed the video, with he thinks it could be legitimate. do you think this is legitimate footage, because, obviously, this comes -- this is related to one of the most sophisticated piece of fighting technology america has. >> yeah, i always take it with a grain of salt. we have to make sure we're going to take a look at it. we'll have our experts analyze it from stem to stern. you know, iran has overinflated many things. they had missiles they said would go 1,200 kilometers. they went 800 kilometers. they had missile tests they said were successful that we know were not successful. so i'm a little bit skeptical that what they claim is true. could it be true? clearly. i think we have some more forensic work to do to absolutely verify, in fact, if this is footage from what they claim is the downed drone. >> and quickly, before we go, martin dempsey, chairman of the joint chiefs was testifying today about what happened in benghazi. you've defended the use of drones and kill
, foreign policy we're great at saying, "make sure internet is everywhere." domestically, for some reason, we haven't done so well. so i see internet access as the heart of a democratic society. >> you use that merger of comcast and nbcuniversal as the window in your book into what this power can do to the aspirations of a democratic internet. >> federal regulators today approved the purchase by comcast of a majority stake in nbcuniversal from general electric. this merger will create a $30 billion media company with cable, broadcast, internet, motion picture and theme park components. the deal is expected to close by the end of the month. >> you say that the merger between comcast and nbcuniversal represented a new frightening moment in u.s. regulatory history. how so? >> comcast is not only the nation's largest broadband distributor with tens of millions of customers, it also now owns and controls one of the four media conglomerates in america, nbcuniversal. that means that it has a built-in interest in making sure that it shapes discourse, controls programming all in the service of its
for not leaking. and what we also see in this is that foreign policy is really run from the white house and not from anywhere else. this is a very white house centric national security team and i think that the president is, of course, first among equals. if you look at those people up on the screen, wolf, it is the president of the united states who made that decision on osama bin laden, hillary clinton and leon panetta wanted to arm the rebels and it was the president who decided differently. so it's very much center data. >> the president of the united states, who makes a decision over rejecting the advice, in the end it's up to him. >> of course it's up to him. what modern presidents center their policy in the white house and if the president is making decisions about his to him is who are the people next to him? and cabinets over the last decade or two, you have strong members of cabinets, no doubt about it. but the policymaking, more and more centered out of that oval office and out of the people who are in that small piece of real estate right around the president. >> what's the
will not make new policy, but, rather, advocate for existing positions. he's going to spend less time on foreign policy than on the economy but that's always the case in his state of the union speeches. on those fronts, expect him to address the drawdown in afghanistan, the u.s. relationship with china and also announce the start of a u.s./european union trade negotiation. big picture, wolf, it sounds like when it comes to republicans, he'll sort of have a club in one hand and olive branch in the other. >> it sounds like he's going to be emphasizing many of the themes he emphasized in the inaugural address. how will this one substantively be a whole lot different? >> his aides say to me that one was the philosophical statement of his beliefs. this one puts molcy meat on the bones. i'm told he will also talk about gay rights, women's rights and climate change. the big difference from the inaugural is the president views tomorrow night as his big opportunity to speak to the american people about the stakes in those across the board budget cuts looming at the end of the month and make his economic
federal current policies as have been said make it difficult for foreign graduate students to stay on in the u.s. such immigrants from the recent decades have contributed hugely as professors and especially as entrepreneurs to our system. and our federal r&d tax credit among other things needs to be made permanent. i was asked to comment on national academies report and i want to cite three that are particularly relevant to the topic of this hearing. i start with our 2005 baseline report rising bonn the -- above the gather storm and thank the committee for supporting the authorization passage and reauthorization of the american compete act that is largely based on it. our findings and recommendations in rising above the gathering stormers relevant today as they were when they were drafted indeed you heard that from mr. temp top. it offered four broad recommendations each backed by specific evidence and twenty specific action items. but the big picture items move k-12 stem education in the us to leading position by global standards. dpubl federal investment in basic research and phy
to global manufacturers that companies have relocated much of their activities on foreign soil. our global trade imbalance is growing as we export less and import more. and today this imbalance includes many high-backed products. other nations are changing their policies to become more competitive and so should we. fortunately blazing trails into new frontiers is what america has always done best. to set the stange for this congress and to -- stage for this congress and to understand where america's heading, we have very knowledgeable witnesses testifying before us today. each of them thoroughly ppedses both public and private research and development efforts as well as where our global competitors are headed. members of this committee have the opportunity to work together on policies that will help america stay competitive and today's hearing is a first step. that concludes my opening statement and the gentlewoman from texas, ms. johnson, is recognized for hers. >> thank you very much, chairman smith. for holding this hearing and thank you also for yesterday's bipartisan retreat which was
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)